Finding rare old books in Japan

While in Japan, I’ve started collecting old books, generally from the Meiji through early Showa periods.  This began when we moved into an empty house in Shinagawa-ku last September and needed to furnish it.  We found much of what we needed at a nearby weekend flea market that’s held at the local horse track.

Since then, I’ve been making regular trips to the flea market, where one can often come across various antiques, Edo period coins, old maps and books.  Since I’m most familiar with books, I’ve stuck to that realm so far.

Here’s some of what I’ve found thus far (click pics to enlarge).  Here’s also the link for flea markets in Tokyo.  Happy rummaging!

By the way, these books are outside of my area of specialization, so I’d love to hear additional input or corrections on any of these materials!

About calebscarter

I specialize in Japanese religions within the broader context of Buddhism and East Asian cultures. Within these fields, I focus especially on Shugendō, a mountain-based tradition in Japan developed largely from esoteric, Zen and Pure Land Buddhism with additional influences from Chinese religions and local spirit worship (later identified as Shintō). I approach these subjects from an interdisciplinary perspective that draws on literary, economic, political, social and intellectual history. I received my Masters (2008) and PhD (2014), both in Buddhist Studies from UCLA, with a BA (2000) in Philosophy from Colorado College. I currently teach full-time for the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at UCLA. Outside of research and teaching, I play a three-stringed instrument from Okinawa called the sanshin and spend time with my family at nearby playgrounds and campgrounds. I also love the outdoors, especially climbing in the mountains—an orientation that has in many ways shaped my current intellectual path. View all posts by calebscarter

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